The centre of pressure position determined by capacity of weight-shifting in stride stances in individuals with post-stroke

  • Nodoka Kimura
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Center for Information and Neural Networks (CiNet), Advanced ICT Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), 1-4 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
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  • Shihomi Kawasaki
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 53, Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan
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  • Akihiro Tsuruda
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 53, Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan
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  • Shiori Nogi
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 53, Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan
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  • Koji Ohata
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 53, Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan
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      Highlights

      • Weight-shifting in stride stances can be important for postural control in walking.
      • Impaired loading on paretic leg causes biased centre of pressure position in stroke.
      • The biased position was linked to the capacity of weight-shifting in stride stances.
      • Assessment of this biased position reveals the ability to control weight-shifting.
      • Balance control in stride stances is a key to improving stable walking after stroke.

      Abstract

      Background

      The dynamics of shifting the centre-of-pressure in stride stances are essential for postural control during the double-limb support phase of gait. Impaired loading onto a paretic limb following stroke causes a biased self-centred position (defined as the centre-of-pressure position in a static stride stance) between legs, which may be related to the capacity of the centre-of-pressure movements. This study investigated anteroposterior centre-of-pressure movements relative to two different positions in stride stances and determine their relationship with the self-centred position and clinical measures after stroke.

      Methods

      Sixteen chronic post-stroke individuals performed anteroposterior weight-shifting in stride stances with the anterior and posterior paretic foot on a plantar pressure platform. The maximum anterior and posterior centre-of-pressure movements in stride stances were quantified relative to the self-centred position and the origin of the platform.

      Findings

      The self-centred position was biased towards the non-paretic limb to maintain identical anterior and posterior centre-of-pressure movements between stride stances with the anterior and posterior paretic foot. Furthermore, the self-centred position was related to the capacity of anteroposterior centre-of-pressure movements in stride stances. Especially, impaired balance function was associated with the self-centred position and decreased posterior centre-of-pressure movement in stride stance with the posterior paretic foot.

      Interpretations

      The assessment of the self-centred position in stride stances can be beneficial in understanding the capability to control weight-shifting. In particular, the improvement of balance control in stride stance with the posterior paretic foot would help to improve postural control during the double-limb support phase following stroke.

      Keywords

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