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Pressure distribution and muscular activity on treadmill–downhill running with an unstable shoe construction and normal running shoes

      It is well known, that downhill walking and running leads to mechanical load, whereas uphill walking and running is energy consuming resulting in much more metabolic turnover (
      • Minetti A.E.
      • et al.
      Energy cost of walking and running at extreme uphill and downhill slopes.
      ). Recently, changes of gait pattern when walking with an unstable shoe construction (USC) have been found (
      • Romkes J.
      • Rudman C.
      • Brunner R.
      Changes in gait and EMG when walking with the masai barefoot technique.
      ,
      • Nigg B.M.
      Effect of an Unstable Shoe Construction on Lower Extremity Gait Characteristics.
      ). In an earlier test, we found a decrease of maximum pressure in the forefoot and a slight increase of maximum pressure in the midfoot using USC when walking horizontally.
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      References

        • Minetti A.E.
        • et al.
        Energy cost of walking and running at extreme uphill and downhill slopes.
        Journal of Applied Physiology. 2002; 93: 1039-1046
        • Nigg B.M.
        Effect of an Unstable Shoe Construction on Lower Extremity Gait Characteristics.
        University of Calgary, 2004
        • Romkes J.
        • Rudman C.
        • Brunner R.
        Changes in gait and EMG when walking with the masai barefoot technique.
        Clinical Biomechanics. 2006; 21: 75-81