Effect of daily physical activity on proximal femur

  • Timo Jämsä
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Technology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • Aki Vainionpää
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Technology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland

    Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland

    Department of Sports Medicine, Deaconess Institute of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • Raija Korpelainen
    Affiliations
    Department of Sports Medicine, Deaconess Institute of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland

    Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Current address: Newtest Ltd., Oulu, Finland.
    Erkki Vihriälä
    Footnotes
    1 Current address: Newtest Ltd., Oulu, Finland.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Technology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland

    Optoelectronics and Measurement Laboratory, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • Juhani Leppäluoto
    Affiliations
    Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Current address: Newtest Ltd., Oulu, Finland.

      Abstract

      Background. The incidence of osteoporotic fractures is increasing and has become one of the major health problems in developed countries. Physical exercise has been found to be effective in the prevention of osteoporosis. However, the optimal amount of exercise is not known. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the intensity of physical activity and bone mineral density at the proximal femur, using long-term quantification of daily physical activity.
      Methods. The study subjects were 64 women (age 35–40 years), who carried an accelerometer-based body movement recorder for 12 months for individual quantification of their daily physical activity. The average distribution of daily accelerations was defined using 33 acceleration levels.
      Findings. A significant relationship between physical activity data and proximal femur bone mineral density was found. Physical activity that induced acceleration levels exceeding 3.6 g correlated positively with the bone mineral density change at the proximal femur, the association being strongest at the femoral neck at 5.7 g ( r = 0.416, P = 0.001).
      Interpretation. The association between physical activity and changes in proximal femur bone mineral density was dependent on the acceleration level of exercise. The quantity and quality of exercise can be monitored with the accelerometer-based physical activity monitor, and the method might be used for optimizing exercise for prevention of osteoporosis.

      Keywords

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